I moved to San Francisco when I was 19. I started washing dishes in a restaurant at Market and Fourth Street in the Hotel Palomar. Meanwhile I enrolled at City College to improve my English, and eventually became a server. I always thought I would go back home, but then I met my wife Carolina here. I saw her for the first time in a picture. I loved her eyes and I knew I was going to marry her.

For the past decade, we lived in a 2-bedroom apartment in The Mission. It was a Sunday morning when the fire happened. I woke up at 7am and our roommate said, “The building is on fire – you better get the kids.” We stood on the street in our pajamas. It started raining. The kids were crying -- they were hungry and cold. I remember our son saying, “I want my cereal.” 

By 4pm they told us the building was unsafe to enter. Carolina said, “I have to go to get our medicines. Our children have asthma, they need it.” But, there was nothing left. Everything was destroyed. The Red Cross put us in a motel for three weeks. 

Our daughter Carolay is 4. She goes to Compass Children’s Center. When we filled out the application – we didn’t expect anything more than childcare. But, they gave us shoes, clothing, food, blankets. For a while, Compass was the only place our daughter would sleep.

Our son Carlo is 7. He understands more. But when baseball season started, he said, Dad, “Where’s my glove, where is my ball? I have practice.” Sometimes we don’t have words. You’re just like, “I’m sorry babe.” 

We lost 12 years of work in one day. But, those things, we’ll get them back. As long as we don’t quit. Thanks to Compass and some Tipping Point donors, we found a tiny studio at Leavenworth and Geary. We have a bunk bed and a sofa bed. The night club on the corner takes out the trash at the end of the night. The bottles are noisy. The cigarette smoke comes in our window. 

I’m still working two jobs, but I’m not making enough to afford to rent in the city. We applied for low-income housing but it’s a lottery -- it just depends if our number gets picked. We have 5 months to figure out what to do. Time is flying. 

I only went to school until 2nd grade but I want my children to be professionals. Right now Carlo wants to be a baseball player, a paleontologist, and a doctor. I tell him, whatever you want to be, you just go for it. The main thing I want my children to remember is how many good and honest people there are in the world. 

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I moved to San Francisco when I was 19. I started washing dishes in a restaurant at Market and Fourth Street in the Hotel Palomar. Meanwhile I enrolled at City College to improve my English, and eventually became a server. I always thought I would go back home, but then I met my wife Carolina here. I saw her for the first time in a picture. I loved her eyes and I knew I was going to marry her.

For the past decade, we lived in a 2-bedroom apartment in The Mission. It was a Sunday morning when the fire happened. I woke up at 7am and our roommate said, “The building is on fire – you better get the kids.” We stood on the street in our pajamas. It started raining. The kids were crying -- they were hungry and cold. I remember our son saying, “I want my cereal.” 

By 4pm they told us the building was unsafe to enter. Carolina said, “I have to go to get our medicines. Our children have asthma, they need it.” But, there was nothing left. Everything was destroyed. The Red Cross put us in a motel for three weeks. 

Our daughter Carolay is 4. She goes to Compass Children’s Center. When we filled out the application – we didn’t expect anything more than childcare. But, they gave us shoes, clothing, food, blankets. For a while, Compass was the only place our daughter would sleep.

Our son Carlo is 7. He understands more. But when baseball season started, he said, Dad, “Where’s my glove, where is my ball? I have practice.” Sometimes we don’t have words. You’re just like, “I’m sorry babe.” 

We lost 12 years of work in one day. But, those things, we’ll get them back. As long as we don’t quit. Thanks to Compass and some Tipping Point donors, we found a tiny studio at Leavenworth and Geary. We have a bunk bed and a sofa bed. The night club on the corner takes out the trash at the end of the night. The bottles are noisy. The cigarette smoke comes in our window. 

I’m still working two jobs, but I’m not making enough to afford to rent in the city. We applied for low-income housing but it’s a lottery -- it just depends if our number gets picked. We have 5 months to figure out what to do. Time is flying. 

I only went to school until 2nd grade but I want my children to be professionals. Right now Carlo wants to be a baseball player, a paleontologist, and a doctor. I tell him, whatever you want to be, you just go for it. The main thing I want my children to remember is how many good and honest people there are in the world. 

carlos01.jpg
carlos02.jpg
carlos03.jpg
carlos04.jpg
carlos05.jpg
carlos06.jpg
carlos07.jpg
carlos08.jpg
carlos09.jpg
carlos10.jpg
carlos11.jpg
carlos12.jpg
carlos13.jpg
carlos14.jpg
carlos15.jpg
carlos16.jpg
carlos17.jpg
carlos18.jpg

I moved to San Francisco when I was 19. I started washing dishes in a restaurant at Market and Fourth Street in the Hotel Palomar. Meanwhile I enrolled at City College to improve my English, and eventually became a server. I always thought I would go back home, but then I met my wife Carolina here. I saw her for the first time in a picture. I loved her eyes and I knew I was going to marry her.

For the past decade, we lived in a 2-bedroom apartment in The Mission. It was a Sunday morning when the fire happened. I woke up at 7am and our roommate said, “The building is on fire – you better get the kids.” We stood on the street in our pajamas. It started raining. The kids were crying -- they were hungry and cold. I remember our son saying, “I want my cereal.” 

By 4pm they told us the building was unsafe to enter. Carolina said, “I have to go to get our medicines. Our children have asthma, they need it.” But, there was nothing left. Everything was destroyed. The Red Cross put us in a motel for three weeks. 

Our daughter Carolay is 4. She goes to Compass Children’s Center. When we filled out the application – we didn’t expect anything more than childcare. But, they gave us shoes, clothing, food, blankets. For a while, Compass was the only place our daughter would sleep.

Our son Carlo is 7. He understands more. But when baseball season started, he said, Dad, “Where’s my glove, where is my ball? I have practice.” Sometimes we don’t have words. You’re just like, “I’m sorry babe.” 

We lost 12 years of work in one day. But, those things, we’ll get them back. As long as we don’t quit. Thanks to Compass and some Tipping Point donors, we found a tiny studio at Leavenworth and Geary. We have a bunk bed and a sofa bed. The night club on the corner takes out the trash at the end of the night. The bottles are noisy. The cigarette smoke comes in our window. 

I’m still working two jobs, but I’m not making enough to afford to rent in the city. We applied for low-income housing but it’s a lottery -- it just depends if our number gets picked. We have 5 months to figure out what to do. Time is flying. 

I only went to school until 2nd grade but I want my children to be professionals. Right now Carlo wants to be a baseball player, a paleontologist, and a doctor. I tell him, whatever you want to be, you just go for it. The main thing I want my children to remember is how many good and honest people there are in the world. 

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