My mom worked too hard for me to be homeless. I was born in Inglewood and we lived in South Central ‘til I was three. It’s a rough area. My grandpa was a big gang member. My mom always said: “I have 5 fingers and I’ve only seen my dad 4 times.” 

When I got out of high school and things got real. I was at a party and a kid I knew from church got shot right in the head, right in front of me. It felt like a sign. I had get out. 

My mom found me crying. I don’t think she had ever seen me like that. She went into her room and printed out a plane ticket to San Francisco. My dad and grandmother were living in a converted garage in the Castro and said I could stay with them. 

My grandmother said that an organization called Year Up had tech internships for young people. On the third day of Orientation, I was doing my homework and my grandma had some guy over. They were drinking beer and being loud, so I put my headphones in. She said I was ignoring her and being disrespectful. She blew up and kicked me out. I remember dragging my duffel bag to Safeway on Church Street to sleep. 

The next day we did a milestones activity at Year Up. You are supposed to talk about all the major turning points in your life. When my turn came, I told them about my life. The last thing I said was, “I don’t have a place to sleep tonight.” Chris, my advisor, took me up to Larkin Street Shelter. He said, “You gotta get him a spot, like tonight. Tonight.” In the dorms, there is no privacy, even in the shower. It’s a big open room with cots. You have to be in by 5pm, out by 7am.

I got assigned to The Gap for my internship. Eventually when Gap hired me and told me what I was getting paid, I was like, “Can I go call my mom?” They said, “Yea, you go ahead.” I ran down like six flights of stairs in 30 seconds. I was jumping. I was like, “Mom, I’m getting 22 dollars an hour!” I’ve been at Gap for a year and a half. I work 30 hours a week and go to City College for computer science and audio production. The beauty of Larkin Street Shelter is that you pay 30% of what you make for rent. When you leave, they give it all back to you as savings.

In a couple months, I’ll be leaving to get my own place. It hasn’t been easy. There were times I broke down. Sleeping outside of Safeway. Staying in a shelter. But I’m proud that I got out of my comfort zone before it was too late. Before I came to San Francisco, I didn’t believe when people told me, “If you work hard, you’ll get there.” I really just thought people got lucky. But now I know that if you get the right opportunity, if you work hard and be consistent, you can do whatever you desire. 

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My mom worked too hard for me to be homeless. I was born in Inglewood and we lived in South Central ‘til I was three. It’s a rough area. My grandpa was a big gang member. My mom always said: “I have 5 fingers and I’ve only seen my dad 4 times.” 

When I got out of high school and things got real. I was at a party and a kid I knew from church got shot right in the head, right in front of me. It felt like a sign. I had get out. 

My mom found me crying. I don’t think she had ever seen me like that. She went into her room and printed out a plane ticket to San Francisco. My dad and grandmother were living in a converted garage in the Castro and said I could stay with them. 

My grandmother said that an organization called Year Up had tech internships for young people. On the third day of Orientation, I was doing my homework and my grandma had some guy over. They were drinking beer and being loud, so I put my headphones in. She said I was ignoring her and being disrespectful. She blew up and kicked me out. I remember dragging my duffel bag to Safeway on Church Street to sleep. 

The next day we did a milestones activity at Year Up. You are supposed to talk about all the major turning points in your life. When my turn came, I told them about my life. The last thing I said was, “I don’t have a place to sleep tonight.” Chris, my advisor, took me up to Larkin Street Shelter. He said, “You gotta get him a spot, like tonight. Tonight.” In the dorms, there is no privacy, even in the shower. It’s a big open room with cots. You have to be in by 5pm, out by 7am.

I got assigned to The Gap for my internship. Eventually when Gap hired me and told me what I was getting paid, I was like, “Can I go call my mom?” They said, “Yea, you go ahead.” I ran down like six flights of stairs in 30 seconds. I was jumping. I was like, “Mom, I’m getting 22 dollars an hour!” I’ve been at Gap for a year and a half. I work 30 hours a week and go to City College for computer science and audio production. The beauty of Larkin Street Shelter is that you pay 30% of what you make for rent. When you leave, they give it all back to you as savings.

In a couple months, I’ll be leaving to get my own place. It hasn’t been easy. There were times I broke down. Sleeping outside of Safeway. Staying in a shelter. But I’m proud that I got out of my comfort zone before it was too late. Before I came to San Francisco, I didn’t believe when people told me, “If you work hard, you’ll get there.” I really just thought people got lucky. But now I know that if you get the right opportunity, if you work hard and be consistent, you can do whatever you desire. 

devin01.jpg
devin03.jpg
devin02.jpg
devin04.jpg
devin05.jpg
devin06.jpg
devin07.jpg
devin08.jpg
devin09.jpg
devin10.jpg
devin11.jpg
devin12.jpg
devin13.jpg
devin14.jpg

My mom worked too hard for me to be homeless. I was born in Inglewood and we lived in South Central ‘til I was three. It’s a rough area. My grandpa was a big gang member. My mom always said: “I have 5 fingers and I’ve only seen my dad 4 times.” 

When I got out of high school and things got real. I was at a party and a kid I knew from church got shot right in the head, right in front of me. It felt like a sign. I had get out. 

My mom found me crying. I don’t think she had ever seen me like that. She went into her room and printed out a plane ticket to San Francisco. My dad and grandmother were living in a converted garage in the Castro and said I could stay with them. 

My grandmother said that an organization called Year Up had tech internships for young people. On the third day of Orientation, I was doing my homework and my grandma had some guy over. They were drinking beer and being loud, so I put my headphones in. She said I was ignoring her and being disrespectful. She blew up and kicked me out. I remember dragging my duffel bag to Safeway on Church Street to sleep. 

The next day we did a milestones activity at Year Up. You are supposed to talk about all the major turning points in your life. When my turn came, I told them about my life. The last thing I said was, “I don’t have a place to sleep tonight.” Chris, my advisor, took me up to Larkin Street Shelter. He said, “You gotta get him a spot, like tonight. Tonight.” In the dorms, there is no privacy, even in the shower. It’s a big open room with cots. You have to be in by 5pm, out by 7am.

I got assigned to The Gap for my internship. Eventually when Gap hired me and told me what I was getting paid, I was like, “Can I go call my mom?” They said, “Yea, you go ahead.” I ran down like six flights of stairs in 30 seconds. I was jumping. I was like, “Mom, I’m getting 22 dollars an hour!” I’ve been at Gap for a year and a half. I work 30 hours a week and go to City College for computer science and audio production. The beauty of Larkin Street Shelter is that you pay 30% of what you make for rent. When you leave, they give it all back to you as savings.

In a couple months, I’ll be leaving to get my own place. It hasn’t been easy. There were times I broke down. Sleeping outside of Safeway. Staying in a shelter. But I’m proud that I got out of my comfort zone before it was too late. Before I came to San Francisco, I didn’t believe when people told me, “If you work hard, you’ll get there.” I really just thought people got lucky. But now I know that if you get the right opportunity, if you work hard and be consistent, you can do whatever you desire. 

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